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Your Partner in Growing Your Community

Certified Business Park Web Partners

Let's Parnter for Increased Visibility

Becoming a CBP Web Partner is easy. Put the CBP website, or your CBP's individual webpage, on your website and we will list you here. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to participate.

Benefits of Certifying Your Business Park

Overview

The Michigan Certified Business Park (CBP) program is a State of Michigan program that is administered by the Michigan Economic Developers Association (MEDA). This designation is a valuable marketing tool used for dual purposes: attracting tenants and enforcing standards. Certification is a promise to your customers that your park is a modern and attractive, high quality business location with the components necessary for success.

Benefits

***NEW IN 2018*** A Certified Business Park filter has been added to the State of Michigan/Michigan Economic Development Corporation's Real Estate Database, ZoomProspector. You can post your properties for free and mark them as Certified. MEDA will share this with our site selector and other contacts on a regular basis in the near future.

Webpage
Upon certification, we will create a webpage in the CBP Website Directory for your park. This webpage is created to profile individual Certified Business Parks by containing general information, a list of tenants, information about the community and why it is a good place to do business, an expandable site plan, a picture, an expandable aerial photo, and more.

The CBP website utilizes a Google Map feature to increase search engine results.

Google Analytics
Sign up for Google Analytics to view your park’s page hits. This will help you analyze the strengths and weaknesses of your marketing efforts, and give you an idea of how much exposure your web page is getting.

Tips for Increasing Hits
MEDA has some tips available for increasing hits to your page. Incorporated are ideas for taking advantage of the Google Analytics account that we create for you.

CBP Newsletter
This newsletter is sent to 2,000 national and international site consultants and thousands of economic developers from around the state. The newsletter contains valuable marketing tips, enhancements to the program, business park news, and more. MEDA encourages you to share news with us that can be added to the newsletter to increase your visibility! Articles or press releases on expansion, retention, new businesses, receipt of awards, etc., can be sent to the MEDA staff at any time for inclusion.

CBP Marketing Flier
Having a printed flier with information about your park is still very important. This modifiable handout will help you put information that is important to decision-makers into a simple and attractive format.

Help A Fellow CBP Owner/Operator
CBP owners/operators can ask for advice that is sent directly to other owners/operators via email for direct response. Request can be direct or confidential.

Become a CBP Web Partner
Remember that sharing links increases your visibility! We will add a link to your company’s website on the MEDA website, if you add your CBP webpage through MEDA to your company's site.

Why Locate in a Certified Business Park Webpage
Ever have a potential tenant ask what certification means? Use this page for a simple explanation of what can be expected from your CBP!

Press Releases to Announce Certification/Recertification
This modifiable press release will assist a Certified Business Park in quickly and easily spreading the word that they have received certification or have been approved for recertification. Photo opportunities with MEDA staff or inspectors are available upon request.

Tax Increment Financing
A CBP located in a qualified local unit of government, as defined by the Local Development Financing Authority Act (PA248 of 2000), has the potential to capture property taxes to aide in the financing of the public infrastructure improvements in or around the park, and/or acquire additional property for park expansion, as well as other public improvements.

Definition and Protective Covenant Requirements

CBP LandscapingThe following are the minimum requirements that must be documented in the Certified Business Park application process.

Definitions

Approved Site Plan or Plat

The owner/developer will need to be in the preliminary stages of getting the entire park platted or have received local government approval of their site development plan.

  • The site plan or plat should include the location and size of utility and road installations, right-of-way, lot lines, and acreage of each lot.
  • The Land Division Act (formerly known as the Michigan Subdivision Control Act) regulates the separation of land into two or more small parcels. Any division of land that will result in one or more of the parcels being less than 40 acres (or the equivalent) is subject to local government review.
  • The local governing unit must approve a site plan or plat and then gain approval of the plat from Office of Land Survey and Remonumentation in the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs. (Local developers and planning officials should have a copy of the Land Division Act on file.)

Graded and Cleared

Flat and level sites with few trees are the norm, but some companies have rolling sites that are somewhat wooded.

  • A developer must determine to what extent grading and clearing detract from the natural beauty of the site.
  • Sand or gravel heaps, knolls, bunkers, or excavations should be removed, leveled, filled, and the property graded.
  • The CBP inspection team shall determine whether the park has met the grading and clearing requirement.

Highway

Access to the business park and its interior sites is an important locational factor.

  • There must be an all-weather road leading to the park, and an all-weather road inside the park, giving access to all interior sites.
  • The 300’ minimum is intended for those parks being developed in phases.

Utilities

For a high-quality development, assurance of reliable utility services is essential.

  • All utilities, including a stormwater control plan, must be readily available for a tap-in.
  • No special consideration will be given for parks in an area not serviceable by a municipality, as this should be an important factor in the planning stages by the community.
  • In areas of the state where it is geologically not feasible for water and sewer line extensions, a letter from a geological engineer stating the reason for this inability might make the park certifiable.

Zoning

  • Property cannot be zoned for retail or residential use.

Protective Covenants

Protective covenants and/or zoning ordinance restrictions set a quality Certified Business Park (CBP) apart from or above an unplanned business development district. They give the owner/developer a great deal of voice in the type of buildings and uses that will be permitted in the park. As these restrictions are tied to the deed, it gives the owner/developer the legal right to enforce those restrictions and thereby maintain the high standards of the development. These restrictions also protect the investment of the purchasers by ensuring that only appropriate and attractive facilities will be located in their area.

Using Zoning Ordinances for Certification

In some instances, a municipality may have zoning ordinances covering the items required under the Protective Covenants section. If the business park does not provide for specific covenants, the zoning ordinance will be accepted if, in the opinion of MEDA and the inspectors, the ordinance provides similar protections for the site owners within the park as would be provided by specific protective covenants that meet the criteria listed below.

CBP Loading DocksProtective Covenants and/or Zoning Ordinance Requirements

Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) and the Michigan Economic Developers Association (MEDA) have determined that the covenants/zoning ordinances will at a minimum include the following:

Compatible Uses

  • The park’s principal use is set aside for industrial, business, and high tech purposes (per the LDFA Act).
  • The area of the park must be specified at the time of certification.
  • This covenant may allow the developer to exclude certain types of industries from locating in the park.

Types of Building Materials

  • All buildings must be constructed in accordance with all applicable laws, statutes, ordinances, codes, rules, and regulations of all governmental agencies which have jurisdiction.
  • All buildings must be constructed to withstand the normal causes of deterioration with normal maintenance procedures.
  • Previously used materials should not be incorporated into any building without the prior written consent of the developer.
  • No temporary buildings are allowed on any grounds of the park.
  • Buildings should be aesthetically pleasing, including finished in materials such as decorative, fluted or finished brick, block, wood, vinyl, glass or decorative metal on sides that face an exterior or internal road.
  • In most instances, the developer will retain the right to review all site materials planned to be used to ensure that all other covenants are being followed.

Landscaping

  • A landscaping and continuous maintenance plan are required.
  • All lots will be seeded or sodded and shrubs and trees must be planted to maintain a park-like atmosphere.
  • Sold or held areas must also be maintained as a lawn area within 25 feet of streets, roadways, and curbs.
  • Areas that are disturbed (such as through excavation, grading, etc.) must be restored to the above standards within 6 months.
  • Landscaping will be installed within one-year of the Certificate of Occupancy.
  • All developments must meet state and local groundwater and watershed standards.

Improved Parking

  • Parking must be well maintained in order to reduce the noise, dust, and potholes.
  • At a minimum, all parking areas, driveways, truck turnaround areas, and truck loading/unloading areas will be paved with concrete, asphalt, or other hard surface material.

Screened Outdoor Storage

  • Business activities cannot be carried out beyond the confines of the building.
  • In instances when outside storage is a necessity, an opaque fence or wall (that is architecturally compatible with the building’s finished materials), or landscaping will shield all outdoor items.

Location of Loading Docks

  • Loading and unloading areas will not impede the public right of way.
  • Design of the truck wells of the loading area will not encroach upon the required front yard setback line.
  • Truck or rail docks should be located at either the side or rear of the building.
  • Certified Industrial Park properties approved before 2000 may be permitted to maintain front yard truck wells or loading areas where they are required due to design and space limitations.

Continuous Management

  • Protective Covenants must state who is responsible for the constant supervision of the park’s covenants and restrictions, i.e.: owner/developer, municipality, or major property owners.
  • In all cases, the management entity of the park will have the authority to enforce the covenants and restrictions on all tenants and future tenants of the park.
  • Management must also maintain non-development and non-developable areas located within the park.

Setback Specifications

  • Setbacks must be specified and no activities should take place within the setback areas.
  • Sidewalks may be placed in the front setback.

Signage Requirements

  • Parks are required to have adequate signage at the park entrance and interior streets.
  • Entrance signs should be of high quality, compatible with the appearance of the park and be of a size that will present a professional image.
  • Entrance signs must be free standing and may not be comprised of neon or flashing lights.
  • Business signs identifying the person, firm, company, or corporation shall be permitted.
  • Business signs must be permanent, may be of a freestanding nature, or attached to the building, except that the signs cannot exceed the height of the building.
  • Business sign materials should be compatible with the appearance of the building’s finished materials.
  • Outdoor advertising, billboards, neon or flashing lights are not permitted.

A copy of the protective covenants should be attached to each deed and signed by each new owner and the applicant shall certify that each owner from the date of this application forward shall execute a copy of the protective covenants at the time of property purchase.

About the Certified Business Park Program

CBP AboutOverview

The Certified Business Park (CBP) program provides additional visibility for high-quality business parks throughout the state in Michigan. Parks are inspected every three years to assure compliance and are provided several benefits.

Park developers throughout Michigan use the program's standards in the design of business parks and work toward achieving certification. Prospects will find that a Certified Business Park offers specific advantages that are not available in other parks.

History

Economic developers have long recognized the need for uniformity in the use of the term “business park.” The expression designates certain kinds of districts or subdivisions set-aside for sites to be occupied by groups of manufacturing and/or high tech industrial facilities.

To give prospective occupants a better idea of what they can expect to find in a business park, as well as assure them of high-quality characteristics and services, the Michigan Department of Commerce and the Michigan Industrial Developers Association, in 1969, adopted a set of standards for qualified developments to be known as “Certified Industrial Parks.”

Beginning with those established criteria, the Michigan Economic Developers Association (MEDA) and the state department now known as the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) updated the standards in 2001 and renewed the voluntary program for certifying business parks.

Potential for Tax Capture

Those Certified Business Parks located in a qualified local unit of government, as defined by the Local Development Financing Authority Act (PA248 of 2000), have the potential to capture property taxes to aid in the financing of the public infrastructure improvements in or around the park, and/or acquire additional property for park expansion, as well as other public improvements.

Obtaining Certification

CertifiedThe following steps have been provided to make certification easy for you. If you have any questions, or need assistance with the process, please contact Cassandra Jorae at 517-241-0011 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Certification Fee

$275 per year
$150 additional processing fee for new certifications

Application Process

Step 1 - Submit the Application File Materials

  1. Application (includes list of Park Tenants)*
  2. Copy-able Site Plot Layout or Site Plan**
  3. Copy of Protective Covenants and/or Community Zoning Ordinance that apply and Covenant Simplification indicating where the protective covenants are located on the document (see: Definition and Covenant Requirements)***
  4. Payment of $425****

* Sending us the application in its electronic form as an Excel document (NOT a PDF) gives us the opportunity to save it for you. That way when it is time to recertify your park, we can simply send you the application back, and you can make any necessary changes rather than filling out a whole new application.
** The Site Plan must be either 8.5x11, 8.5x14 or 11x17 inches.
*** Failure to meet any of the requirements upon filing the application, or during the on-site inspection, will deem the park uncertified. The park owner/developer/manager will then have 90 days to bring the park up to these standards for another on-site inspection. After this 90 day period a new application must be filed.
**** Check payable to MEDA.

Step 2 - Review and Inspection (Inspector's Form)
MEDA reviews the application form for completeness of information and then assigns a certifying team to inspect the park. The certifying team will schedule a meeting with the park contact. Upon the meeting, the team and the park contact review the application and supporting documents when necessary to verify all information. The team personally inspects the park.

Step 3 - Approval
The certifying team will either recommend certification, deny certification, or recommend changes before certification can be granted. If the business park meets all qualifying criteria, it is certified. Any parks not achieving certification will be entitled to a 90-day grace period to work towards meeting the criteria. If the necessary improvements are not made in 90 days, a new application is needed when the business park meets the certification criteria.

Step 4 - Certification
A certificate, signed by the Governor of the State of Michigan, is sent to the park contact by MEDA after the park is certified. MEDA will contact the park owner to process certification benefits.

Maintaining Certification

The recertification process is very similar to the certification process. Once certified, parks must apply for recertification and be inspected every three years to maintain certification. MEDA will send correspondence as a reminder when it is time. The yearly fee of $275 will cover the recertification and inspection of your park once it has been certified.

Recertification Application Process

Step 1 - Submit the Application File Materials
The following items are needed for recertification. MEDA sends each park the materials from its last certification and parks are given the option of just noting changes to the last set or materials or submitting new materials.

  1. Application (includes list of Park Tenants)*
  2. Copy-able Site Plot Layout or Site Plan**
  3. Copy of Protective Covenants and/or Community Zoning Ordinance that apply and Covenant Simplification Simplification indicating where the protective covenants are located on the document (see: Definition and Covenant Requirements)***

* Sending us the application in its electronic form as an Excel document (NOT a PDF) gives us the opportunity to save it for you. That way when it is time to recertify your park, we can simply send you the application back, and you can make any necessary changes rather than filling out a whole new application.
** The Site Plan must be either 8.5x11, 8.5x14 or 11x17 inches.
*** Failure to meet any of the requirements upon filing the application, or during the on-site inspection, will deem the park uncertified. The park owner/developer/manager will then have 90 days to bring the park up to these standards for another on-site inspection. After this 90 day period a new application must be filed.

Step 2 - Review and Inspection
MEDA reviews the application form for completeness of information and then assigns a certifying team to inspect the park. The certifying team will schedule a meeting with the park contact. Upon the meeting, the team and the park contact review the application and supporting documents when necessary to verify all information. The team personally inspects the park.

Step 3 - Approval
The certifying team will either recommend certification, deny certification, or recommend changes before certification can be granted. If the business park meets all qualifying criteria, it is certified. Any parks not achieving certification will be entitled to a 90-day grace period to work towards meeting the criteria. If the necessary improvements are not made in 90 days, a new application is needed when the business park meets the certification criteria.

Step 4 - Recertification
A certificate, signed by the Governor of the State of Michigan, is sent to the park contact by MEDA after the park is recertified. MEDA will contact the park owner to process certification benefits.

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Contact Us

Michigan Economic
Developers Association
P.O. Box 15096
Lansing, MI 48901-5096
PH: 517-241-0011
meda@medaweb.org